Barcelona

We take a flight from Memmingen to Barcelona Girona by Ryanair. The transfer to Barcelona works according to plan. On the cocoon-website, we have booked a small apartment (http://www.cocoonbarcelona.com/en/), which is close to the station and is a good starting point. The first evening we go on foot and finally discover "Tapas 24". Tapas and wine are great, though a bit pricey. Although it is very crowded, we get a place at the bar and enjoy watching the scene.

Via the Placa Catalunya, which is as big as St. Peter's Square in Rome, we walk home late at night. This Placa is good for orientation. It is located at the northern end of the Rambla (one of the most fully, loudest pedestrian zones) and is a hub for many traffic routes.

At Port Vell, a lot is going on. We admire the sailing boats, visit the aquarium and enjoy the atmosphere in the many small cafes and bars that extend from the Columbus monument (which is wearing an FC Barcelona tricot) stretching out along the coast. A wooden pedestrian bridge, the Rambla de Mar, connects the city centre of Barcelona with the Moll d'Espanya.
Of all the storage halls at Port Vell, only one has not been torn off, the Palau de Mar. It was built by Elies Rogent at the end of the 19th century and now includes a museum, the Museu D'Historia de Catalunya.

Barcelona has a lot to offer. The Santa Maria del Mar church was built in the 14th century in just 55 years by Berenguer de Montagut. The construction was unique and pioneering at the time. The Casa Milà was the last building of Antoni Gaudi before he completely devoted himself to the construction of the Sagrada Familia. The basilica is Barcelona's most famous landmark. Since 1882 it is still being built. It is huge and often called a cathedral. The Pavellons Güell are also a work of Gaudi.

The Placa d'Espanya is a roundabout, from which you can see the Montjuic, Barcelona's local mountain. In Las Arenas bullfighting took place, today it is a shopping centre. From the roof terrace, you have a good view of the Placa, the two bridges and the Palau National, which is home to the National Museum of Catalunya.

Particularly remarkable in Barcelona is the smell. Everywhere, it smells of dainties, which you can’t resist. Also, the market halls are worth seeing and they invite you to taste wine, fresh fruit or even the hearty ham. By the way enjoying: On our last evening we have dinner at the Bali Lounge of Carpe Diem Lounge Club (http://www.cdlcbarcelona.com/carpe-diem-lounge-club), which is situated directly at the artificial sand beach. We all agree that 4 days in Barcelona are far too few.

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